Philanthropy Impact

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Women Give 2010

Report
October 2010
The Women’s Philanthropy Institute of the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University

A study by The Women’s Philanthropy Institute of the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University shows that women who run single-headed households give more than men in similar situations across almost every income group studied. When you get to the highest income level, the percentage difference narrows to 26 percent from a high of 49 percent.

Some 95 percent of the most affluent women – those earning more than $103,000 -- report giving to charity versus 75.8 percent of men in similar circumstance, according to the study. The smallest percentage of giving was in the lowest income levels, with 35.2 percent of female household heads reporting giving to charity versus male head of households.

Men in the $23,509 to 43,500 income range gave 32 percent more than women, according to the study, the only category where they exceeded women. Widowers are also more likely to give than widows, according to the report, with men giving an average $1,820 versus $928 for women.

Never married females gave $783 annually versus never married men who gave $498. Divorced females gave an average $641 versus $483 for men, according to the study.

In no cases did the single households approach the average giving level of 2.2 percent as citing in the annual Giving USA report, researched by the Center on Philanthropy. According to the study’s authors, married households give more to charitable causes compared to single households and this would push up the amount donated.

 

This report is tagged under:

  • Charity selection
  • Philanthropy stats & trends
  • Women's Philanthropy